The Tax Advantage of a Structured Settlement Payment

Structured settlement payments are a key part of any settlement between both parties and because it involves financial numbers, it automatically factor in some issues over taxation. Let this tiny bit of information illustrate how a long-term agreement can give you tax advantages. When a person sues another person due to some sort of injury and wins the case, the claimant will receive monetary compensation for the loss through a settlement payment agreement. Before, settlements come in the form of a lump sum but this proved to be very demanding…

Questions and Answers on Structured Settlements

Q: What are Structured Settlements? A: If you have been involved with a lawsuit involving personal injury settlements, your attorney may suggest that you consider structured settlements. This is when your case involves settling for a large amount of money, and often the other side’s attorney will offer a plan for you to receive the settlement amount over a proposed period of time, rather than all at once in a lump sum. The payouts can range from an annual payment over a period of 10 years, for instance, to perhaps…

Tamanaha on John Dewey on Law

Brian Z. Tamanaha, Washington University, St. Louis, School of Law, is publishing John Dewey on Law in the Encyclopeida of the Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy (forthcoming). Here is the abstract. John Dewey wrote a handful of essays on various legal topics, and he made sprinkled references to law in his voluminous body of work. He did not elaborate a special theory of law, but rather analyzed legal matters from a pragmatic standpoint, treating law like other social institutions. This entry therefore begins with a summary of pragmatism. Then…

EU Law Analysis: Should the EU sanction its Member States for breaches of rule of law and human rights? Part 1: The Legal Framework

Professor Steve Peers, University of Essex I’ve taught EU law and human rights for over twenty years now, and the issue of sanctions against Member States for human rights breaches used to be the easy bit. Why? Because the procedure to enforce such sanctions (set out in Article 7 TEU) had never been used – and there was no apparent prospect that it ever would be. So there was no need to discuss it in any detail. A more theoretical sort of academic might have spent time counting the angels…