Moustaira on Who Needs Comparative Law @emoustai

Elina Moustaira, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, School of Law, is publishing Who Needs Comparative Law?! What a Question! in Comparazione e Diritto Civile (2017). Here is the abstract. It is argued that in a world of steadily increasing contacts and mutual influences, we need to understand the other people, the other laws. It does not suffice to cite descriptions of law’s function or of various states’ attitudes towards the law. Thus, the comparative perspective is used in order to approach and comprehend a legal culture. Download the article…

Mulligan on Diverse Originalism @MulliganEsq ‏

Christina Mulligan, Brooklyn Law School, is publishing Diverse Originalism in the University of Pennsylvania Journal of Constitutional Law. Here is the abstract. Originalism has a difficult relationship with race and gender. People of color and white women were largely absent from the process of drafting and ratifying the Constitution. Today, self-described originalists are overwhelmingly white men. In light of these realities, can originalism solve its “race and gender” problems while continuing to be originalist? This Article argues that originalists can take several actions today to address originalism’s race and gender…

Zeno-Zencovich on Data Visualization and Legal Epistemology

Vincenzo Zeno-Zencovich, University of Rome III-Department of Law, has published Through a Lawyer’s Eyes: Data Visualization and Legal Epistemology 459 in Law, Norms, and Freedoms in Cyberspace/Droit, Normes, et Libertes dans le Cybermonde: Liber Amicorum Yves Poulet (Elise Degrave, Cecile de Terwangne, Severine Dusolier, et Robert Querck, eds., Larcier, 2018). The article aims at investigating the relationship between the law and its visual depiction, in the light of the growing use of vast amounts of data to represent social phenomena. Visual analytics and infographics are part of contemporary forms of…

Munshi on Race, Citizenship, and the Visual Archive @GeorgetownLaw

Sherally Munshi, Georgetown University Law Center, is publishing ‘You Will See My Family Became so American’: Race, Citizenship, and the Visual Archive in Law and the Visual: Representation, Technologies, and Critique (Desmond Manderson, ed., 2018). Here is the abstract. In 1932, the United States government sought to cancel the citizenship of Dinshah Ghadiali, an immigrant from India, alleging that Ghadiali “by reason of his not being a free white person or a person of African nativity or descent is, and was, ineligible racially for naturalization.” Ghadiali was one of dozens…

Law & Humanities Blog: Green on Legal Monism: An American History @WMLawSchool

Michael S. Green, William & Mary Law School, has published Legal Monism: An American History in Vienna Legal Philosophy 23-48 (Christoph Bezemek, Michael Potacs, and Alexander Somek, eds., Hart Publishing, 2018) (Vienna Lectures on Legal Philosophy). Legal monism is the view that necessarily one, and only one, legal system exists. The legal norms of all past, present, and possible communities exist only within in an overarching legal system, which does not itself depend upon any community for its existence. Current legal philosophers — including those who might be described as…

Govan Law Centre seeks qualified solicitors to join our Glasgow legal team

Govan Law Centre (GLC) seeks qualified solicitors to join our Glasgow legal team. We are seeking solicitors with civil court/tribunal experience.  We offer the opportunity to develop your legal career, undertake contentious/novel litigation, and utlise innovative client solutions as we expand our legal services across Glasgow and Scotland.Experience in the fields of housing, homelessness, and public law would be an advantage. These are full time posts, however, job sharing will be considered. These positions will be based in our Govan HQ, and will include provision of a variety of legal advice and representation for…

Meyer on Sisyphus and the Clockmaker: Two Views of the Rule of Law in Keally McBride's "Mr. Mothercountry: The Man Who Made the Rule of Law

Linda Ross Meyer, Quinnipiac University School of Law, has published Sisyphus and the Clockmaker: Two Views of the Rule of Law in Keally McBride’s ‘Mr. Mothercountry: The Man Who Made the Rule of Law’. Here is the abstract. This essay is an engagement with Keally McBride’s excellent book, “Mr. Mothercountry: The Man Who Made the Rule of Law,” and argues that the rule of law is not a law of rules, but a culture of self-restraint and humility. Download the article from SSRN at the link. Source link

Pier Giuseppe Monateri, Political Sublime and the World Order (Hart Publishing, 2018) @hartpublishing

This monograph makes a seminal contribution to existing literature on the importance of Roman law in the development of political thought in Europe. In particular it examines the expression ‘dominus mundi’, following it through the texts of the medieval jurists – the Glossators and Post-Glossators – up to the political thought of Hobbes. Understanding the concept of dominus mundi sheds light on how medieval jurists understood ownership of individual things; it is more complex than it might seem; and this book investigates these complexities. The book also offers important new…